EXHIBITIONS

Ferdinand Hodler
Early Modern Artist

8 September 2017 to 28 January 2018

Ferdinand Hodler (1853–1918) is one of the most important and most successful artists of the early twentieth century. Celebrated alongside Edvard Munch and Gustav Klimt as a key representative of Symbolism and Art Nouveau, he developed a distinctive style of his own. Hodler’s predilection for ornament, his formal repetitions, strong contour lines and idiosyncratic palette were hailed as novel and original by contemporary critics, and his impressive monumental works with their emphasis on large areas of flat colour and clear outlines met with great interest, particularly in Germany.
With more than hundred paintings and numerous drawings, the exhibition is the first comprehensive retrospective of the artist to be shown in Germany in almost twenty years. It sheds light on Hodler’s career – training, travels abroad, participation in competitions, scandals and exhibitions – and presents works from the genres of landscape, portrait, figure and history painting.

Weather Report
About Weather Culture
and Climate Science

7 October 2017 to 4 March 2018 

The weather – beautiful and threatening in equal measure – is always with us. Weather is climate made tangible, and the record of weather patterns over a period of thirty years can be read as a climate trend. Weather and climate determine our life and survival on earth. The exhibition asks to what extent short-term weather events and long-term climate change influence human civilisation and culture. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach to this highly topical subject, we are showing a wide range of objects, spanning art, cultural history and science from all over the world. Amongst many others the show includes art works by John Constable, William Turner, Gustave Courbet and Otto Modersohn, as well as scientific treasures by Otto von Guericke, Daniel Fahrenheit and Alfred Wegener. The history of meteorology and current aspects of global climate change play a central role in the exhibition.

An Exhibition by the Bundeskunsthalle and the Deutsches Museum
In Cooperation with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Deutscher Wetterdienst
Curators: Stephan Andreae, Ralph Burmester, Andrea Niehaus

Achim Mohné – 0,0064 Megapixel
Planet Earth is blue and there‘s nothing I can’t do

5 November 2017 to 4 March 2018

Parallel to the United Nations Climate Change Conference, which takes place in Bonn in November 2017, and the exhibition Weather Report – About Weather Culture and Climate Science at the Bundeskunsthalle, the artist Achim Mohné presents a thematically related, large-scale work in the forecourt of the Bundeskunsthalle.
Mohné transposes Earthrise, the world-famous photograph of planet earth, from digital space into the physical space of the museum forecourt, by aligning the digital pixels of the image with a corresponding number of concrete floor tiles. He thus recreates a digital image as an analogue, large-scale mosaic composed of 6400 square floor tiles.

Gurlitt: Status Report
Nazi Art Theft and its Consequences

Bundeskunsthalle, Bonn: GURLITT: STATUS REPORT
Nazi Art Theft and its Consequences
November 3, 2017 to March 11, 2018

Kunstmuseum Bern: GURLITT: STATUS REPORT
“Degenerate Art” – confiscated and sold
November 2, 2017 to March 4, 2018

The Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn and the Kunstmuseum Bern are collaborating in the organization of a concurrent double exhibition. The two exhibitions will, for the very first time, be focusing on a selection of works of art from the Cornelius Gurlitt estate. Under the title of Gurlitt: Status Report the two exhibitions will present Cornelius Gurlitt’s extensive art collection. Both shows are based on the latest research into “Gurlitt’s art trove” and seek to bring to light further evidence to help clarify the provenances of those works whose origins remain unknown.
In form and content, the exhibitions at the Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn and at the Kunstmuseum Bern are closely coordinated. In Bern the focus lies on art that was considered “degenerate” and on works from the Gurlitt family circle. The Bundeskunsthalle, on the other hand, will concentrate on works of art that were taken from their owners as part of the Nazi persecution and on works whose provenance has not yet been established. Primarily, the exhibition in Bonn will shed light on the fate of the persecuted, mostly Jewish art collectors – and art dealers, juxtaposing their individual histories with the biographies of the Nazi perpetrators. Moreover the show homes in on the unprecedented theft of art by the Nazis in the occupied territories.

Federal Prize for Art Students

23rd Federal Competition of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research
10 November 2017 to 28 January 2018

The federal competition Art Students Display Their Works has been renamed and is now called Federal Prize for Art Students. The new name reflects a new conceptual approach. The exhibition will showcase only the work of the prize winners. This closer focus allows for a better presentation of the awardees and their work. Each of the twenty-four art academies in Germany nominates two of their most promising students for a chance to win the much coveted prizes. An independent jury selects five to eight winners, who will receive a grant to support their work and a catalogue.
The Federal Prize for Art Students is sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and organised by the German National Association for Student Affairs. It’s aim is the support and promotion of young artists.
The design of the poster and the catalogue accompanying the 23rd competition lies in the hands of the Hochschule der Bildenden Künste Saar.

Künstlerförderung EHF 2010 © Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, Berlin

Eine Ausstellung von Stipendiat(inn)en der Künstlerförderung der Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, Berlin

23. Februar bis 22. April 2018

Fünf Künstler/-innen machen sich auf die Reise, schaffen im Spiel aus Nähe und Distanz ambivalente Erfahrungsräume, in denen Vertrautes fremd und Fremdes vertraut wird. Die eigene Verortung bleibt eine sich verflüchtigende, der Aufbruch ist schon avisiert. Stef Heidhues, Veronika Kellndorfer, Cyrill Lachauer, Alexej Meschtschanow und Hans-Christian Schink finden in unterschiedlicher formaler Auflösung, in Fotografie, Text, Skulptur und Installation zu Raumerfahrungen, in denen kurzfristig auftaucht, was Wahrheit meinen könnte.
In der Ausstellung hinterlassen die beteiligten Künstler/-innen Spuren ihrer Begegnungen und legen sie als Fährten aus. Die Besucher folgen ihnen und erleben statt stringenter Geschichten vielmehr Verschichtungen disparater Erfahrungen, die sich trotz erkennbarer räumlicher und historischer Verweise einer dokumentarischen Kartografie entziehen. Ambivalenz wird zum Kriterium der künstlerischen Arbeit und zur Voraussetzung von Erkenntnisgewinn.

Alle Künstler/innen sind Träger des Stipendiums aus dem Trustee Programm EHF 2010 (Künstlerförderung der Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung).

Erik van Lieshout, Aus der 9-teiligen Serie ohne Titel (The Island), 2015, Sammlung zeitgenössischer Kunst der Bundesrepublik Deutschland

„Germany is not an Island“
Contemporary Art Collection of the Federal Republic of Germany
Acquisitions 2012 – 2016

8 March to 27 May 2018

The exhibition presents a selection of works acquired over the last five years by a specialist committee for the Contemporary Art Collection of the Federal Republic of Germany. It includes works by renowned young artists. The acquisitions testify to the high standard of the Federal Collection and show how historical and current developments, collective viewing habits and the questioning of image constructs translate into contemporary art. Ranging from large-scale installations to drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, video and sound works, the selection bears witness to the wealth of media and techniques that distinguish contemporary artistic practice.

An exhibition of the Bundeskunsthalle in cooperation with the Federal Government Commissioner for Culture and Media

Marina Abramovic, The Cleaner (Ausschnitt), B&W Photograph © Marina Abramovic, Foto: © Marco Anelli 2010, Courtesy of the Marina Abramovic Archives © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017

Marina Abramovic
The Cleaner

20 April to 12 August 2018

Radical, controversial and admired in equal measure, Marina Abramović is one of the most talked about international artists today. She is famous for her ground-breaking performances in which she explores personal experience and responsibility and continues to probe her own physical and psychological limits. She addresses fundamental existential questions – the passage of time, physical vulnerability, memory, pain, loss, endurance and trust – that provoke or touch the viewer with great immediacy.
The first major retrospective to be shown in Europe, the exhibition presents works from all periods of Abramović’s career – from the early years to the present. Films, photographs, paintings and objects, installations and select archival material shed light on the depth and conceptual reach of the Marina Abramović’s creative cosmos. A series of re-performances (re-enacted by different artists) enhances the visitor experience.

An exhibition of the Bundeskunsthalle in cooperation with the Moderna Museet, Stockholm, and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk

Geoglyphen Reloj Solar, Foto: Markus Reindel (DAI)

Nazca – Divine Drawings
Archaeological Discoveries
from Southern Peru

10 May to 16 September 2018

In the southern Peruvian desert, one of the biggest archaeological mysteries is waiting to be solved: the giant geoglyphs of the Nazca culture of ca. 200 BC – 650 AD.
There has been endless speculation about the meaning of the Nazca Lines. But it was not until recently that archaeological research has provided clues to the worldview and culture of the Nazca.
The exhibition takes visitors on a fascinating journey into the mysterious southern Peru of the Nazca period. It invites them to marvel at rich funerary gifts from vast burial complexes, images of strange flying beings – half human, half animal – on colourful ceramic vessels and the most stunningly beautiful archaeological textile finds. Many of the exhibits have never been shown outside Peru. The geoglyphs, some of which extend over several kilometres on the arid plateau between the towns of Nazca and Palpa, are presented in modern multimedia installations.

An exhibition of the Museo de Arte de Lima – MALI – and the Museum Rietberg, Zürich, in cooperation with the Bundeskunsthalle

Michel Majerus, if we are dead, so it is (Ausschnitt), 2000, Installationsansicht: Michel Majerus, Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, 2011/2012 © Michel Majerus Estate, courtesy neugerriemschneider, Berlin und Matthew Marks Gallery, Foto: David Franck

The Playground Project
Outdoor

31 May to 28 October 2018

To complement The Playground Project (from 13 July), the Bundeskunsthalle is opening the roof garden and the forecourt to Outdoor, an exhibition on the subject of ‘Play’, which provides contemporary artists Nevin Aladag, Kristina Buch, Olafur Eliasson, Jeppe Hein, Carsten Höller, Christian Jankowski, Llobet & Pons, Michel Majerus, Andreas Schmitten, Thomas Schütte, Superflex, Rirkrit Tiranavija, Alvaro Urbano and Ina Weber with an opportunity to design interactive installations and spaces, forms and utensil for play. Visitors are invited to experience art in a playful, participatory and performative manner. According to a philosophical definition of Homo ludens, play is a primary condition of the generation of culture, because it is through play that Homo ludens, unlike Homo faber, develops his skills. It is in play as a fundamental, formative and necessary human activity that he discovers his individual qualities, and this experience allows him to develop his dormant personality. In this definition, play is equated with freedom and autonomy of mind.

Carsten Höller, Bonn Slide, 2018 Simulation, Tubular spiral slide (stainless steel with polycarbonate cover), height ca. 13,60 meter, length ca. 35 meter © Carsten Höller, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017

Carsten Höller
Bonner Rutschbahn / Bonn Slide

ab 31. Mai 2018

Der in Stockholm lebende belgische Künstler Carsten Höller hat für die Bundeskunsthalle eine spezielle, ortsbezogene Slide für die Eingangsfassade entwickelt, die das Dach und den Vorplatz verbinden wird. Die Skulptur und die Architektur von Gustav Peichl gehen damit eine respektvolle Symbiose ein, die den Besucher beides anders verstehen lässt, als die separate Betrachtung von künstlerischer Ästhetik und funktionaler Nutzung. Die Arbeit wird mit der Ausstellung The Playground Project – Outdoor eröffnet, bleibt aber für mehrere Jahre installiert und saisonal nutzbar.
Carsten Höller versteht ein Museum auch als Raum für Experimente, Innovationen und zum Erproben unerwarteter Ideen und Konzepte. So erweitert er das Medium Skulptur zum Handlungsraum und macht die körperliche und emotionale Erfahrung und Wahrnehmung des Betrachters/Besuchers auf spielerische Weise zum zentralen Bestandteil seiner Kunst. 

Vajiko Chachkhiani, Winter which was not there (Ausschnitt), 2017, One Channel HD video, Film Stills, Courtesy the artist and Daniel Marzona, Berlin

Vajiko Chachkhiani
Heavy Metal Honey

29 June to 7 October 2018

Vajiko Chachkhiani’s works explore existential questions of life and our culture of remembrance. They are notable for the conceptual intelligence and quiet poetry with which he invests even violent themes such as war and death. Looking more closely, the viewer can share in the thought processes and research of the Georgian artist. He retells allegories of everyday life in seemingly familiar images but subtly undermines them with unexpected twists. The artist’s films, sculptures, photographs and extensive installations suggest different paths and weave them into a unified whole.
For the exhibition in Bonn, Chachkhiani develops a film and sculpture installation that reflects the cycle of life and the parallelism of stories. Heavy metal in the ground stands as a metaphor for history and honey – sweet but viscous – as a metaphor for internal family structures. Global and individual history share points of intersection at which they are inextricably linked. And it is only the moment of action and recognition that can flip a switch and set stories/history on a different course that changes the narrative.

Lozziwurm, Yvan Pestalozzi, 1972 (neu hergestellt in 2015), Foto: Annik Wetter

The Playground Project

13 July to 28 October 2018

The playground is a by-product of the industrialised city of the twentieth century. Like no other space, it combines and focuses ideas about education and childhood, city planning and public space, architecture and art, creativity and control. At the same time, the playground continues to resist institutional and ideological appropriation and keeps developing in its own way, occasionally with anarchic results. It is this side-by-side of different and divergent expectations, current and momentary achievements and adventurous ideas that makes the playground so intriguing.
Drawing on the work of outstanding designers, The Playground Project illustrates the key moments in the history of the playground and presents images, films, plans and models of projects by artists, designers, activists and architects.

The Playground Project was developed as a travelling exhibition by Gabriela Burkhalter and adapted for its presentation at the Bundeskunsthalle in cooperation with the Kunsthalle Zürich.

James Jacques Joseph Tissot (1836–1902), Mr. Frederic Leighton (detail), Vanity Fair caricature, 29 June 1872, private collection © Look and Learn/Peter Jackson Collection/Bridgman Images

Malerfürsten

28 September 2018 to 27 January 2019

In the Renaissance and the Baroque period, painters like Raphael, Titian, Rubens and van Dyck attained a special status that came with social recognition and courtly privilege. In their conduct and self-portraits, these artists presented themselves as Malerfürsten, as ‘painter princes’. The Malerfürst phenomenon, which transcends national borders and spans several centuries, forms the starting point of the exhibition. Focusing on the heyday of the Malerfürst in the nineteenth century, it showcases artists such as Frederic Lord Leighton, Hans Makart, Franz von Lenbach, Mihály Munkácsy, Jan Matejko, Friedrich August von Kaulbach and Franz von Stuck. It investigates their carefully crafted public personas, the veneration they inspired and their ability to draw on a network of powerful contacts to advance their social status. New reproductive print media, extravagantly staged exhibitions, studio visits and interviews in newspapers promoted the artists and their work, created a highly profitable international market and successfully established the social construct of the Malerfürst.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Vor Sonnenaufgang (Ausschnitt), 1925/26 © Sammlung des Glarner Kunstvereins

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Imaginary Journeys

16 November 2018 to 17 February 2019

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, co-founder of the Brücke group, is one of the best-known German Expressionists. One of the leitmotifs of his life and work is the quest for the exotic and the primal, for far-off lands and cultures. It led him to create strikingly colourful images that conjure imaginary, far-away worlds, without ever leaving the everyday reality of his life.
Tracing the artist’s progress through Dresden, Berlin, Fehmarn and Davos, the exhibition sheds light on Kirchner’s career. With a selection of more than 180 paintings, the retrospective explores how the artist responded to social and artistic influences, engaging with them in ever new ways, always prepared to break new ground, both personally and pictorially.

The exhibition Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Imaginary Journeys is curated by Katharina Beisiegel and Franziska Brüggmann (Art Centre Basel) in collaboration with Dr. Thorsten Sadowsky (Director of the Kirchner Museum Davos). The exhibition is organised by the Art Centre Basel in cooperation with the Bundeskunsthalle.

Szenenfoto aus M – EINE STADT SUCHT EINEN MÖRDER, Deutschland 1931, Regie: Fritz Lang, Quelle: Deutsche Kinemathek, © Horst von Harbou

Neues Sehen
Das Kino der Weimarer Republik

14. Dezember 2018 bis 17. März 2019

Die Deutsche Kinemathek und die Bundeskunsthalle bereiten gemeinsam eine umfangreiche Ausstellung zum Kino der Weimarer Republik vor. Wie keine andere Kunstform rezipierte und beförderte der Film den Zeitgeist der Moderne: Mode und Sport, Mobilität und urbanes Leben, Genderfragen und das Entstehen der Psychoanalyse spiegeln sich im Kino der 1920er-Jahre. Zugleich professionalisierte sich das filmische Handwerk, Genres wurden ausgebildet und erzählerische Konventionen geprägt. Keine andere Stilepoche des deutschen Films wirkte so prägend auf die internationale Filmästhetik wie das Weimarer Kino. Mit großzügigen Inszenierungen und Medieninstallationen sollen diese Innovationen erlebbar werden. Darüber hinaus wird die Ausstellung aus den reichhaltigen und bedeutenden Sammlungen der Deutschen Kinemathek schöpfen.

An exhibition of Bundeskunsthalle, Bonn, and Deutsche Kinemathek, Berlin

Show bibliography
Illustrations
  1. Claude Monet (1840–1926) Waterloo Bridge, 1903Bequest of Cornelius Gurlitt 2014Claude Monet (1840–1926) Waterloo Bridge, 1903, Bequest of Cornelius Gurlitt 2014
  2. Gabriel Loppé, Der Eiffelturm wird vom Blitz getroffen, 1902, Fotografie© bpk RMN - Grand Palais / Gabriel LoppéGabriel Loppé, Der Eiffelturm wird vom Blitz getroffen, 1902, Fotografie © bpk RMN - Grand Palais / Gabriel Loppé
  3. Ferdinand Hodler, The Vaud Alps as seen from the Rochers de Naye (detail), oil on canvas, c. 1917 © Stiftung für Kunst, Kultur und Geschichte, Winterthur, Photo: SIK-ISEA, Zürich
  4. Composition: Carina Schwake, 2017 © Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland GmbHComposition,:Carina Schwake, 2017 © Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland GmbH
  5. James Jacques Joseph Tissot (1836–1902), Mr. Frederic Leighton (detail), Vanity Fair caricature, 29 June 1872, private collection© Look and Learn/Peter Jackson Collection/Bridgman ImagesJames Jacques Joseph Tissot (1836–1902), Mr. Frederic Leighton (detail), Vanity Fair caricature, 29 June 1872, private collection © Look and Learn/Peter Jackson Collection/Bridgman Images
  6. Lozziwurm, Yvan Pestalozzi, 1972 (neu hergestellt in 2015), Foto: Annik WetterLozziwurm, Yvan Pestalozzi, 1972 (neu hergestellt in 2015), Foto: Annik Wetter
  7. Vajiko Chachkhiani, Winter which was not there (Ausschnitt), 2017, One Channel HD video, Film Stills, Courtesy the artist and Daniel Marzona, BerlinVajiko Chachkhiani, Winter which was not there (Ausschnitt), 2017, One Channel HD video, Film Stills, Courtesy the artist and Daniel Marzona, Berlin
  8. Michel Majerus, if we are dead, so it is (Ausschnitt), 2000, Installationsansicht: Michel Majerus, Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, 2011/2012 © Michel Majerus Estate, courtesy neugerriemschneider, Berlin und Matthew Marks Gallery, Foto: David FranckMichel Majerus, if we are dead, so it is (Ausschnitt), 2000, Installationsansicht: Michel Majerus, Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, 2011/2012 © Michel Majerus Estate, courtesy neugerriemschneider, Berlin und Matthew Marks Gallery, Foto: David Franck
  9. Marina Abramovic, The Cleaner (Ausschnitt), B&W Photograph © Marina Abramovic, Foto: © Marco Anelli 2010, Courtesy of the Marina Abramovic Archives © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017Marina Abramovic, The Cleaner (Ausschnitt), B&W Photograph © Marina Abramovic, Foto: © Marco Anelli 2010, Courtesy of the Marina Abramovic Archives © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017
  10. Sammlung zeitgenössischer Kunst der Bundesrepublik DeutschlandErik van Lieshout, Aus der 9-teiligen Serie ohne Titel (The Island), 2015, Sammlung zeitgenössischer Kunst der Bundesrepublik Deutschland
  11. Geoglyphen Reloj Solar, Foto: Markus Reindel (DAI)Geoglyphen Reloj Solar, Foto: Markus Reindel (DAI)
  12. Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Vor Sonnenaufgang (Ausschnitt), 1925/26 © Sammlung des Glarner KunstvereinsErnst Ludwig Kirchner, Vor Sonnenaufgang (Ausschnitt), 1925/26 © Sammlung des Glarner Kunstvereins
  13. Künstlerförderung EHF 2010 © Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, BerlinKünstlerförderung EHF 2010 © Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, Berlin
  14. Carsten Höller, Bonn Slide, 2018 Simulation, Tubular spiral slide (stainless steel with polycarbonate cover), height ca. 13,60 meter, length ca. 35 meter Carsten Höller, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017Carsten Höller, Bonn Slide, 2018 Simulation, Tubular spiral slide (stainless steel with polycarbonate cover), height ca. 13,60 meter, length ca. 35 meter © Carsten Höller, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017
  15. Szenenfoto aus M – EINE STADT SUCHT EINEN MÖRDER, Deutschland 1931, Regie: Fritz Lang, Quelle: Deutsche Kinemathek, © Horst von HarbouSzenenfoto aus M – EINE STADT SUCHT EINEN MÖRDER, Deutschland 1931, Regie: Fritz Lang, Quelle: Deutsche Kinemathek, © Horst von Harbou
  16. Google Earth, Simulation, Achim Mohné, VG Bild-Kunst 2017, Courtesy Galerie Judith Andreae, BonnGoogle Earth, Simulation, Achim Mohné, VG Bild-Kunst 2017, Courtesy Galerie Judith Andreae, Bonn

Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland

Museumsmeile Bonn
Friedrich-Ebert-Allee 4
53113 Bonn
T +49 228 9171–200

Opening hours

Mondays closed
Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.
Thursdays–Sundays, 10 a.m.–7 p.m.
(including public holidays even those which fall on Mondays)

Gefördert durch